The Project

What new civic virtues are required for the networked age?

Digital networking and algorithms are transforming the ways we make decisions and interact with one another. In 2018, scholars at the University of Oxford launched a research project to promote human flourishing in this evolving technological landscape.

Today, the choice is not between citizens and machines, it is about identifying and protecting humans’ uniqueness as moral decision-makers.

These ideas and goals are at the heart of the Citizenship in a Networked Age report.

The Project

What new civic virtues are required for the networked age?

Digital networking and algorithms are transforming the ways we make decisions and interact with one another. In 2018, scholars at the University of Oxford launched a research project to promote human flourishing in this evolving technological landscape.

Today, the choice is not between citizens and machines, it is about identifying and protecting humans’ uniqueness as moral decision-makers.

These ideas and goals are at the heart of the Citizenship in a Networked Age report.

What new civic virtues are required for the networked age?

The Project

Digital networking and algorithms are transforming the ways we make decisions and interact with one another. In 2018, scholars at the University of Oxford launched a research project to promote human flourishing in this evolving technological landscape.

Today, the choice is not between citizens and machines, it is about identifying and protecting humans’ uniqueness as moral decision-makers.

These ideas and goals are at the heart of the Citizenship in a Networked Age report.

Launch Events

The Citizenship in a Networked Age event series is now underway. Here is the latest news:

  • The AEI Events podcast released a miniseries on Citizenship in a Networked Age. Visit their website to listen to Part 1, Part 2Part 3, and Part 4.
  • On 10 June, The Royal Institution hosted a launch event with panelists Andrew Briggs (Oxford Department of Materials), Michael J. Reiss (University College London), and Dame Wendy Hall (University of Southampton). A video of the event is forthcoming.
  • The team is excited to announce a three-part podcast series, now available to stream on our website. It will soon be available on iTunes and other podcast distributors.
  • A video of the kick-off symposium (27 May) is on YouTube.

Because of COVID-19, there have been changes to the event schedule and locations. Below are the current details for past and planned events. The team will add more information as it becomes available.

CiNA Launch Events Placeholder
CiNA Launch Events

27 May 2020

The Hague, NL. Watch the recorded symposium here.

2 JUNE 2020

UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, UK. Listen to the podcast.

10 JUNE 2020

ROYAL INSTITUTION, LONDON, UK. Information here.

June 2020

Washington D.C., USA

TBA June 2020

Boston, USA

TBA OCT. 2020

TSINGHUA UNIVERSITY, BEIJING, CHN

TBA JAN. 2021

Bangalore, IND

TBA MAY 2021

ROME, IT

The Podcast

We are excited to announce three new episodes of the Citizenship in a Networked Age podcast:

Episode 1: “Citizenship in a Networked Age” (ft. Andrew Briggs and Michael Reiss, with Dominic Burbidge)

Episode 2: “Trust, Unity & Democracy in the Networked Age” (ft. Nancy Snow and Rosalind Piccard, with Dominic Burbidge)
Episode 3: “Our New Networked Community following COVID-19” (ft. Jens Koed Madsen and Zizi Papacharissi, with Dominic Burbidge)

Our Digital Global Village

The Report

An Agenda
for Rebuilding
Our Civic Ideals
How can we embrace the positive features of social and technological change while addressing their deep implications for citizenship?
oxford university digital networking

The Process

Global Engagement

The research for this report benefited from consultation with leading international experts of technological change and human flourishing. In addition, a local advisory group convened multiple times in the University of Oxford to refine the report’s scope of inquiry.

We are grateful to those who gave generously of their time at the following conferences and consultation meetings:

A summary of the research ideas gathered through the initial consultation phase is available in the publication, ‘Promoting Human Flourishing through the Best of Scientific Insight and Spiritual Wisdom: A Global Engagement’ (2019).

A look inside the report

A look inside

a selection of key topics explored in Citizenship in a Networked Age

Civic Engagement

How is the character of citizenship changing in the networked age? Learn more.

Values-Based Decision-Making

How can the technologies of the networked age contribute to values-based civic engagement? Learn more.

Time and Attention

How is technology changing how people interact within communities? Learn more.

Public and Private Spaces

How does privacy provide protected space for citizens to reflect on what matters most to them? Learn more.

Decision-Making by Machines and Citizens

How can machine decision-making serve the goals of a just society and a united citizenship? Learn more.

Meet Our Authors
Dominic Burbidge

Lead Author, University of Oxford

Dominic Burbidge researches decentralisations (technological and governmental), citizenship, and social trust. He is Research Director in the University of Oxford, External Advisor to Templeton World Charity Foundation, and Director of the Canterbury Institute. Dr. Burbidge is the single author of two books and nine peer-reviewed articles, which focus on the nature of democracy, social trust, and human connectivity.

Andrew Briggs

University of Oxford

Andrew Briggs is the inaugural holder of the Chair in Nanomaterials at the University of Oxford. In 1999, he was elected Honorary Fellow of the Royal Microscopical Society for his innovative methods and applications of microscopy. From 2002-2009, he was Director of the Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration in Quantum Information Processing. He has more than 600 publications, with nearly 25,000 citations. His latest book, It Keeps Me Seeking: The Invitation from Science, Philosophy, & Religion, with Hans Halvorson and Andrew Steane, was published by OUP in September 2018.

Michael J. Reiss

University College London

Michael J. Reiss is Professor of Science Education at University College London, Visiting Professor at the Universities of York and the Royal Veterinary College, an Anglican priest, and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, the Society of Biology, and the Royal Society of Arts. He is President of the International Society for Science & Religion and of the International Association for Science and Religion in Schools. Previously, he was Specialist Advisor to the Houses of Commons (education) and Lords (bioethics). His recent books address topics including science pedagogy, strategies for teaching about human origins, and values in sex education.

Contact Us

To learn more or attend an event, please use the form below to contact our team.

“Citizenship in a Networked Age” was funded by a grant to the University of Oxford from Templeton World Charity Foundation. The opinions expressed in this project are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Templeton World Charity Foundation, Inc.

University of Oxford
Department of Materials
16 Parks Road
Oxford, OX1 3PH